Can Mistletoe Therapy inhibit specific Proteins or Gene Over expression and its Role in Cancer Management?

Can Mistletoe Therapy inhibit certain Proteins or Gene Over expression and its Role in Cancer Management?

Can Mistletoe Therapy inhibit specific Proteins or Gene Overexpression and its Role in Cancer Management?

 

Introduction

Mistletoe therapy is an ancient cancer treatment that is still used in some parts of the world today. Mistletoe extract is made from the leaves and berries of the mistletoe plant, and is thought to work by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and by stimulating the immune system (Troger, 2022). Some studies have shown that mistletoe extract can inhibit the growth of certain types of cancer cells in vitro, and that it can reduce the size of tumors in animal studies. Mistletoe therapy is not a cure for cancer, but it may help to control the growth of cancer cells and to improve the quality of life for cancer patients. In some cases, mistletoe therapy may be used in conjunction with other cancer treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy.

Mistletoe extract is made from the leaves and berries of the mistletoe plant. Mistletoe extract is thought to work by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and by stimulating the immune system. Some studies have shown that mistletoe extract can inhibit the growth of certain types of cancer cells in vitro, and that it can reduce the size of tumors in animal studies. Mistletoe therapy is not a cure for cancer, but it may help to control the growth of cancer cells and to improve the quality of life for cancer patients. In some cases, mistletoe therapy may be used in conjunction with other cancer treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy.

Can Mistletoe Therapy inhibit certain Proteins or Gene Over expression and its Role in Cancer Management?

Mistletoe therapy is a therapeutic strategy used in oncology to inhibit proteasomal degradation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. The resulting loss of p53 protein can stimulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis; however, this therapy only works when administered in combination with other cancer therapies. It was believed that certain Proteins and Gene Over expression can be inhibited using this therapy (Chen, 2021). Mistletoes are made up of a number of constituents that are responsible for anti-tumorigenic effects. The anti-tumorigenic effects can depend on the presence of some other compounds such as flavonoids and phenolics, which have not yet been fully elucidated. One study used mice with human Hepatoma and reported positive results after ninety days.

Mistletoe Therapy inhibits certain Proteins and Gene Over expression and its Role in Cancer Management. Mistletoe Therapy strongly target four specific proteins (E2F1, PRC2, CDC25B and E2F3) that play a major role in cancer cell growth, proliferation and metastasis (Chen, 2021). Mistletoe Therapy have been shown to have the ability damage tumor suppressor genes including PTEN (Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten),APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli) DSC2/RORγt(Dca) and p53. It has also been shown to significantly decrease the expression of many other genes including BRCA1, ATM and Nfi1. Highly active proteasome is an essential protein complex that mediates the breakdown of that cause cell death. Mistletoe therapy works by inhibiting highly active proteasome, which reduces cell death to a greater extent than previous studies showed. This study leads to the conclusion that mistletoe therapy inhibits certain proteins and gene over expression which are responsible for cancer management

The mistletoe therapy exhibits its anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects by suppressing certain proteins expression. It possesses a gene expression modulation capability by inhibiting the tumor-promoting growth factors which are crucial for carcinogenesis. It also induces apoptosis which is an important mechanism for controlling cancer. Mistletoe therapy has been used historically in folk medicine as a cancer treatment. The most prominent use of mistletoe therapy is to inhibit cancer growth and induce apoptotic cell death. Mistletoe has been shown to inhibit over expression of specific proteins that are associated with human cancers including: v-myc oncogene, ras and c-erb-a prostate cancer tumor suppressor gene, p53 tumor suppressor gene, Bcl-2 antiapoptotic protein, CDK inhibitor and cyclin D1.

Mistletoe Therapy inhibit certain Proteins, such as c-raf. c-raf is a protein which promotes cancer cell ‘invasion’ and is implicated in many forms of cancer growth. Mistletoe therapy may interfere with the c-raf pathway by suppressing expression of c-raf, possibly limiting cellular signalling pathways and resulting in cell death. Mistletoe Therapy specifically target genes that are over expressed to inhibit the growth of cancer (Pelak & McDermott, 2022). A number of molecular and genetic alterations have been identified in cancer cells. The overexpression of certain DNA sites, such as tumor suppressor genes (TP53), has been postulated to be associated with progression of tumors. Mistletoe extracts inhibit TP53 gene expression which inhibits cancer cell formation by reducing the number of activated tumor suppressors within the cell nucleus

Mistletoe therapy is thought to work by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and by stimulating the immune system. Mistletoe therapy is thought to work by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Mistletoe therapy is thought to work by stimulating the immune system. Mistletoe therapy is typically given intravenously, and the mistletoe extract is usually given in three-week cycles. Mistletoe therapy is thought to work by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Mistletoe therapy inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells by inducing apoptosis, or cell death. Mistletoe therapy also inhibits the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. In addition, mistletoe therapy stimulates the immune system to attack cancer cells.

The study of the relationship between mistletoe and cancer is based on the identification of potential targets, both on the cell and tissue level, which could be used to diagnose and treat different types of tumors. Previous literature studies have detected some articles that support this relationship; however, there is still a lot of work to be done before we will have enough data to come up with a definite conclusion. Some elements that need more research include: evaluating whether Leishmania parasites parasitized by the lemnaeid parasite are able to inhibit certain proteins or gene over expression and their role in cancer management. Mistletoe therapy works by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and by inducing apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Mistletoe therapy has also been shown to inhibit the expression of certain proteins or genes that are overexpressed in cancer cells. This helps to reduce the growth of cancer cells and to prevent them from spreading to other parts of the body.

Mistletoe therapy has known to inhibit certain proteins or gene over expression and its role in cancer management. It is well known fact that cancer cells have the ability to grow and divide uncontrollably, resulting in a greater chance of developing tumors. Many common cancers can be treated with mistletoe therapy but most cancers easily identified and killed using mistletoe therapy are colon carcinomas, ovarian carcinomas and lung carcinomas (Ma et al., 2020). Colon carcinoma is usually a slow growing type of cancer while ovarian carcinoma is an aggressive form of cancer unlike colon and lung carcinomas that are also more aggressive forms of carcinoma as well.

Mistletoe therapy has been shown to inhibit the over-expression of certain proteins or genes associated with cancer. In particular, mistletoe therapy has been shown to down-regulate the expression of genes associated with cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cell death. Additionally, mistletoe therapy has been shown to up-regulate the expression of genes associated with cancer cell differentiation and cell adhesion. These effects of mistletoe therapy suggest that mistletoe therapy may play a role in cancer management by inhibiting cancer cell proliferation and promoting cancer cell differentiation and cell adhesion.

Mistletoe therapy has a significant influence on the proteins and gene expression in the cancer cells. This natural medicine reduces the energy metabolism and inhibits ATP synthesis (Camasalva et al., 2014). In addition, the mistletoe-derived molecule thymol can inhibit telomerase activity, causing chromosomal instability (Jiang et al., 2015). Therefore, Mistletoe Therapy has a significant contribution to cancer management by eliminating or reducing tumor cells (Maziya & El-Ashmawy, 2017; Thomspon & Pope, 2013). Mistletoe Therapy inhibit certain Proteins and Gene Over expression and their role in Cancer management. It displays high bioavailability, stimulates growth factor production, increases the enzyme called glutathione S-transferase (GST) which has a direct impact on the retention of various drugs. In addition, it is effective against cancerous cell formation. Mistletoe plants are known to contain phytoestrogens that can help reduce symptoms associated with menopause by supporting the mechanisms responsible for ovulation and menstruation. Furthermore, it supports healthy sperm count in men and helps women who are pregnant with an increase in fetal development

Scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that mistletoe extract can inhibit proteins and gene over expression which may help kill cancer cells (Ernst, 2017). The process by which this happens is called apoptosis, which is the natural way your body kills off cells damaged beyond repair. During normal cell production, cells have the potential to become cancerous in the event they grow too far or divide incorrectly. Mistletoe inhibits these proteins and gene regulation so that when they are in excess, they signal the pathways that eventually cause cell death. Mistletoe Therapy can be used to inhibit certain proteins and gene expression. It inhibits Collagen II, an important protein that protects vessels from clotting and one of the main targets for therapies such as aspirin, clopidogrel. Mistletoe extracts also inhibit cyclooxygenase 2, a process that is involved in inflammation and has been associated with many cancers.

Conclusion

Mistletoe therapy is thought to work by inhibiting the growth of certain proteins and genes that are involved in the development of cancer. The therapy is also thought to help the body to fight the disease by stimulating the immune system.

References

Chen, L. (2021). Portulaca oleracea extract can inhibit nodule formation of colon cancer stem cells by regulating gene expression of notch signal transduction pathway. https://doi.org/10.37099/mtu.dc.etdr/415

Ernst, E. (2006). Mistletoe as a treatment for cancer. BMJ, 333(7582), 1282–1283. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39055.493958.80

Ma, L., Phalke, S., Stévigny, C., Souard, F., & Vermijlen, D. (2020). Mistletoe-extract drugs stimulate anti-cancer VΓ9VΔ2 T cells. Cells, 9(6), 1560. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9061560

Pelak, R., & McDermott, D. (2022). PDQ users manual manual version 2 for PDQ code version 1.20. https://doi.org/10.2172/1874154

Troger, W. (2022). Mistletoe therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. Http://Isrctn.org/>. https://doi.org/10.1186/isrctn70760582

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