Targeted Therapy in Cancer -

What is Targeted Therapy in Cancer

Targeted therapy is a type of cancer treatment that targets specific genes or proteins that are involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells. It is often used in combination with other cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Targeted therapies are designed to attack cancer cells while sparing normal cells. This helps to minimize the side effects of treatment.

Targeted therapy is different from traditional cancer treatments, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Traditional cancer treatments often damage normal cells as well as cancer cells. This can cause side effects, such as fatigue, nausea, and hair loss while targeted therapy is more precise than traditional cancer treatments. This helps to spare normal cells from damage.

There Are Several Different Types Of Targeted Therapy Drugs, Including:

These are man-made versions of immune system proteins that can bind to specific molecules on the surface of cancer cells. This binding can block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Monoclonal antibodies can also help the immune system to kill cancer cells.

These drugs work by blocking the activity of certain enzymes called tyrosine kinases. These enzymes are involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells. By inhibiting their activity, tyrosine kinase inhibitors can help stop the growth and spread of cancer cells.

These drugs work by inhibiting the function of proteasomes. Proteasomes are proteins that break down other proteins inside cells. By inhibiting their function, proteasome inhibitors can prevent the breakdown of proteins that are needed for cancer cell growth and survival.

These drugs work by inhibiting the activity of enzymes called histone deacetylases. These enzymes are involved in the regulation of gene expression. By inhibiting their activity, histone deacetylase inhibitors can prevent the growth and spread of cancer cells.

Art Of Healing Cancer Approach To Targeted Therapy

Identify DNA Mutations or RNA Overexpression through Tumor Tissue Analytics or through Stem Cells from Liquid Biopsies

Identify Primary Concern Genes/DNA/RNA and also Proteasomes for Drug Resistance

Build a 360 Degree Approach to Block known Mutations/Over Expressions

Examples of Targeted Therapy

Breast Cancer

Targeted therapies can be used to treat many different types of cancer, including breast cancer. In breast cancer, targeted therapies are used to target the HER2 protein, which is overexpressed in some types of breast cancer. Targeted therapies that target the HER2 protein include trastuzumab (Herceptin) and lapatinib (Tykerb).

Lung Cancer

The most common type of targeted therapy used to treat lung cancer is known as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). TKIs work by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes known as tyrosine kinases. These enzymes are involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells. By inhibiting their activity, TKIs can help to stop the growth and spread of cancer cells. Several TKIs are already FDA-approved for the treatment of lung cancer, including gefitinib (Iressa), erlotinib (Tarceva), and afatinib (Gilotrif). These drugs are typically given as pills that are taken orally.

Thyroid Cancer

Some targeted therapies that have been approved for use in the treatment of thyroid cancer include lenvatinib (Lenvima), sorafenib (Nexavar), and cabozantinib (Cometriq). These targeted therapies work by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes or proteins that are necessary for cancer cell growth and division.